Home About Us Funding News Explore Gallery Contact Us Blog
© Galloway MRT - A Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation (SCIO) - Charity Number SC020065

Team History

Our First Training Exercise

Transcript - Galloway Gazette 20th December 1975

Leader of the newly formed Galloway Search and Rescue Group. Mr. P Wright, said at  the groups first exercise on Sunday that it was encouraging to see so many people. Volunteers had arriving at the Caldons Camp recreation Hut in Glen Trool during the  early morning, and by 10am over 30, already wearing waterproof clothing and  walking boots had assembled in the hut where they were addressed by Mr Wright. He said that the group was doubly lucky to have Dr H Lang, who is not only a doctor  but a competent mountaineer. He was impressed with both the experience and the  gear of everyone present. South West Scotland does not have a high call out and  there had been reluctance to set up a new unit. This group is a sub-unit of Moffat  Rescue Team and is known as Unit 67. Deputy, Mr A Shankland is to enquire about  prices of equipment and all equipment will be kept at Newton Stewart. At present  the group had the use of two stretchers. Mr Wright said that he was pleased to see that many had a good knowledge of the  use of a map and compass which must be up to scratch and he emphasised the  importance of first aid. There were some people who would like to be concerned  with the group but who were unable to go out on a rescue. These people are very  valuable he stressed for they were needed to work at the base. The group must arrange a system of passing messages. He was not terribly keen on  whistles as too many whistles can be confusing. Discipline is very important and  everyone will be relied upon for their particular skills.  For Sunday's exercise, the group were to imagine that someone had gone fishing the  previous day, in the vicinity of Loch Valley and had not returned. The method of  search would depend on current conditions. Those unfamiliar with the area and with  the use of a map and compass, were advised to go with someone who was. Chairman Dr Lang then gave the group a word of advice about first aid. "Care in  handling people is most important" and he added that "Waterproofing and insulation  are more important than first aid".  The importance of communication was stressed by secretary and base organiser, Mr L  Simpson who said that the group had two-way radios and these will be available.  However he warned that the frequency is very near BBC2. Before everyone left the hut to begin the mock rescue, Dr Lang and Mr Wright  demonstrated how to use the Mcinness stretcher which was on loan from the Forestry Commission. This collapsible, steel-framed stretcher can be carried empty by one  person like a rucksack.  After the demonstration everyone went by car to Bruce's Stone in Glentrool, where  they were joined by deputy leader Mr Shankland. After splitting into two parties the  group set off in a slight drizzle to find their missing fisherman somewhere in the  Galloway Hills  Reproduced courtesy of the Galloway Gazette - June 2004     
Galloway Mountain Rescue
Providing a 24/7 search and rescue service in South West Scotland

Fundraising Officer

We rely so much on public support and our Fundraising Officer is responsible for managing our annual fundraising calendar.  We are grateful for all your donations, big or small.

Team Secretary

The secretary of any organisation is a pivotal position and our hard working secretary is likely to be your first point of contact with any correspondence. 
More Info More Info
next previous years in operation  40 1975-2015
Navigation
© Galloway MRT 2015

Team History

Our First Training Exercise

Transcript - Galloway Gazette 20th December 1975

Leader of the newly formed Galloway Search and Rescue Group. Mr.  P Wright, said at the groups first exercise on Sunday that it was  encouraging to see so many people. Volunteers had arriving at the Caldons Camp recreation Hut in Glen  Trool during the early morning, and by 10am over 30, already  wearing waterproof clothing and walking boots had assembled in the  hut where they were addressed by Mr Wright. He said that the group was doubly lucky to have Dr H Lang, who is  not only a doctor but a competent mountaineer. He was impressed  with both the experience and the gear of everyone present. South  West Scotland does not have a high call out and there had been  reluctance to set up a new unit. This group is a sub-unit of Moffat  Rescue Team and is known as Unit 67. Deputy, Mr A Shankland is to  enquire about prices of equipment and all equipment will be kept at  Newton Stewart. At present the group had the use of two stretchers. Mr Wright said that he was pleased to see that many had a good  knowledge of the use of a map and compass which must be up to  scratch and he emphasised the importance of first aid. There were  some people who would like to be concerned with the group but  who were unable to go out on a rescue. These people are very  valuable he stressed for they were needed to work at the base. The group must arrange a system of passing messages. He was not  terribly keen on whistles as too many whistles can be confusing.  Discipline is very important and everyone will be relied upon for  their particular skills.  For Sunday's exercise, the group were to imagine that someone had  gone fishing the previous day, in the vicinity of Loch Valley and had  not returned. The method of search would depend on current  conditions. Those unfamiliar with the area and with the use of a  map and compass, were advised to go with someone who was. Chairman Dr Lang then gave the group a word of advice about first  aid. "Care in handling people is most important" and he added that  "Waterproofing and insulation are more important than first aid".  The importance of communication was stressed by secretary and  base organiser, Mr L Simpson who said that the group had two-way  radios and these will be available. However he warned that the  frequency is very near BBC2.  Before everyone left the hut to begin the mock rescue, Dr Lang and  Mr Wright demonstrated how to use the Mcinness stretcher which  was on loan from the Forestry Commission. This collapsible, steel-  framed stretcher can be carried empty by one person like a  rucksack.  After the demonstration everyone went by car to Bruce's Stone in  Glentrool, where they were joined by deputy leader Mr Shankland.  After splitting into two parties the group set off in a slight drizzle to  find their missing fisherman somewhere in the Galloway Hills  Reproduced courtesy of the Galloway Gazette - June 2004     
Galloway Mountain Rescue
next previous
Providing a 24/7 search and rescue service in South West Scotland
years in operation  40 1975-2015